Home Sci-TechScience This aquatic pet's ass comes loose – and goes looking for sex alone

bannerebay

This aquatic pet's ass comes loose – and goes looking for sex alone

by Ace Damon
This aquatic pet's ass comes loose - and goes looking for sex alone

The annelids of the Syllidae family create pockets of gamete at the end of the body – which develop eyes and swim to breed on the surface.

access_time

Sep 27, 2019, 7:54 pm – Posted on Sep 27, 2019, 7:45 pm

My high school biology teacher taught … interesting classes. But truth be told, not even Carl Sagan could make the annelid phylum interesting. In addition to garden worms – Darwin's last book was all about them – the phylum also contains 11,000 species of polychaetes, tiny animals that live in the water and are very colorful. What polychaetes and worms have in common, in the eyes of a layman, is the segmented body in "slices". For taxonomists, however, the similarities are much more evident.

Now I have found that polychaetes deserved more than a footnote in textbooks. Because they have sex in a fascinating way. Some of them at least: those in the Syllidae family. Here is a picture cool one.

Although they spend their lives crawling on the ocean floor – usually in shallow water around coral reefs – many polychaetes still have to go to the surface of the water to reproduce. Different families of polychaete gave different solutions for moving up to the motel upstairs, and the trick adopted by the Syllidae family. it's the most fun.

Instead of going in person, they send bags of sperm and eggs up. Like a gamete delivery. And then the orgy occurs without the presence of couples. The bag bursts, the gametes are released and unite at random.

Now in more detail: a polychaete Syllidae, like an ordinary terrestrial earthworm, is a long thing and divided into segments. Every thirty days or so, the last ten or twelve segments of the body — that is, the butt, or butt, as you may call it — become an independent gamete bag, which even has four rudimentary eyes. Yes, four. After all, this segment will stand out from the rest of the animal and go its own way. He needs to see.

This independent segment is called stubble. According a 1981 scientific paper From the University of Hawaii, its formation is simple to observe: in Typosyllis pulchra, the female's back becomes blue or purple with the accumulation of eggs, and the male's body turns white or light pink by sperm accumulation. Each month, a worm produces three or four stolen.

Moral of the story? When you feel sad, think at least you have Tinder left. And when you're going to have sex your genitals don't go swimming away from you. Yeah, maybe it's not much comfort.

banneraliexp

DIVIDER1

Related Articles

Leave a Comment

eleven − 6 =

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Top Services Available: Try Amazon HomeClose